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Scan, Index, Retrieve

Confidentiality and Security

Your paper is our priority and we take every step to ensure it is safe. We personally collect your documents so you can be sure they are never in the wrong hands.

Our secure premise has 24 hour CCTV, intruder and fire monitoring systems all linked to emergency services.

Our staff are contractually bound by non-disclosure agreements to maintain confidentially at all times.

 

Legal Admissibility

A key issue that companies often want to know is whether the process of creating the electronically stored documents and the preceding destruction of original copies is compliant with current legislation.

The following statement made by Companies House relates to the way in which their information may be used as such evidence:

‘If a document is admissible in evidence then an electronic image of that document may be treated as secondary evidence in the same manner as a photocopy or a microfiche image. It will be subject to the provision authentication contained in the Civil Evidence Act (1995) in England and Wales and the Civil Evidence Act (Scotland) 1998′

File Flatners work to the British Standard Institution BIP 0008:2008 – Code of Practice for Legal Admissibility and Evidential Weight of Information Stored Electronically. This code of practice, along with the Data Protection Act provides clear guidance to ensure, as far as possible, that electronic documents and scanned images will be accepted as evidence by the courts. The key to this guidance is that the process under which documents are managed is as important as the technology used – where a document is reproduced (e.g. printed), it should accurately reproduce the contents of the “original”.

The Civil Evidence Act (1995) introduces a flexible system whereby all documents and copy documents, including computer records, can be admitted as evidence in civil proceedings. The court judge will still have to be persuaded to treat that evidence as reliable, and so organisations will have to put in place procedures to prove the authenticity and reliability of the record.